Resources

Arcana - mysterious or specialized knowledge

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logo-2f1d736ffb892665e33365145c702fb4Have you noticed that the letter "L" appears in the model number of many Shure wireless microphones? In 1990, the Shure "L" series VHF wireless system was introduced. It was to have been named the "Liberty" series, however a legal search found that "Liberty" was already used as a pro audio product trademark. In a flash, "Liberty" was shortened to "L." Five years later, the "L" series was replaced by the "LX" series. "X" was added to "L" simply as a place-holder during the internal development and design stages. "LX" became so commonly used within Shure that the Marketing Department reluctantly decided to use it as the official series model number. This led to "SLX," "ULX," "ULX-D," "GLX-D," "BLX," and now "QLX-D."

…bLame it aLL on the trademark "statute of Liberty."

 

Three Keys for Building Design

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Editor's note: We can't stress enough that you read this article, read it again, and then promise to follow all of Mike's recommendations.  If you do so, you'll be ahead of 90% of churches out there.  One of my investment advisors rants that no one really wants to learn about investing, but that most people just want a quick-fix.  It's the same in the technical world.  There are no shortcuts when it comes to proper planning, equipment selection, and integration. 

by Mike Sessler, ChurchTechArts.org

Today I’d like to tackle a few suggestions that I always give to churches who are starting a building project. I always say the same thing, mainly because these are the areas I see churches skipping time after time. Skipping these things ensures two things: First, you and your congregation will not be happy with the performance of the sound, lighting and/or video in the room. Second, there will remain a healthy market for companies that specialize in fixing churches that were designed and built poorly.

With that said, here are three things you cannot skimp on when entering a building project.

Fix the Acoustics Before You Build

First, the overall acoustic signature of the room has to be correct. This is where most churches skimp out. They let the architect design the building; which is fine except I've yet to meet an architect who has any real clue how acoustics work. A few do, but they're the ones who design churches for a living and have acousticians on staff.

The problem is most architects want the room to look nice and be easy to build.

Read more: Three Keys for Building Design

   

Gurus of Tech Main Session Videos

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If you attended Gurus of Tech 2013 and want to watch again, or if you didn't get a chance to make it to Willow Creek in Chicago this year, here's your chance to check it out. 

View all five main sessions featuring Todd Elliott, Lincoln Brewster, Steve Carter, Andrew Stone, Whitney George, and Curtis Templeton!

Click this link to go there. 

 

   

Gurus of Tech 2013 Breakout Sessions

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On May 21-22, I made my first trek to the Gurus of Tech conference at Willow Creek Community Church in South Barrington, IL.  Rumor has it that there were 1800 of us there for two days of learning, sharing, fellowship and worship. 

For those of you who are sorry that you didn't get to attend, now you can.  Well, almost.  Take a listen to topics like, "How Loud is Too Loud?", "Video Production with a DSLR", "Environmental Projection" and 26 more.  Click here to go there.  And after you're there, just click on the classroom name to stream. Or you can right click to save as an mp3 download. Enjoy!

   

God Sees Your Service

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by Mike Sessler, ChurchTechArts.org

A big part of the problem with serving behind the scenes is that you are, by definition, supposed to be pretty much invisible. Most of the time, we technical artists are OK with that. We'd rather not be the ones on stage, talking to the crowd; or even in a big room full of people if we're honest. We like to be in the background, and that's OK. But there's a problem with being invisible.

We tend to feel invisible, too.

I'm sure it's happened to you (and if it hasn't, it will) on a Sunday afternoon that while you're picking up the stage, eager congregants will come up and tell the worship leader, band and pastor what a wonderful job they did. They'll go on and on about how much they love to worship, and how much they got out of the message. This is all good.

But it can sting a little, too.

We know that we helped make the service happen. Shoot, we may have even made the band a sound a lot better than they really are (reverb covers a multitude of sins, and sometimes turning down a guitar is better than turning it up...). We made sure the pastor's slides were made, and displayed at the right time. All the mic's worked exactly the way they were supposed to. The lighting complimented the music, and the service was technically excellent.

And nobody noticed.

Read more: God Sees Your Service

   

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What others say

Thanks for the great job you all have done!  Thanks for suggesting and sticking with the digital board. The benefits are awesome.

We are so pleased with having great sound, lighting tech...etc in the building.  I have been in many new churches where the sound is squeaking, squawking etc. and it ruins the services.  We have had few to no glitches. There are still many things that I would like to do.

By the way the remote clicker for the Power Point worked great, reached from the platform to the back of the room.

I am looking forward to continuing a working relationship and a growing friendship.

Pastor Steve Hubbard
Ebenezer Baptist Church