Product Reviews

DPA DFine Mic - First Thoughts

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

by Mike Sessler, ChurchTechArts.org

I can honestly say I’ve been waiting for this mic for almost two years. I first met Bruce Meyers, then President of DPA, US at WFX in 2009. I had been a huge fan of the 4088 and 4066, and desperately wanted to move our pastor off of the e6 to a DPA. However, he didn’t like dual-ear designs and wouldn’t wear one. When I talked with Bruce about that, he said they were working on a solution and it would be ready when it was right. Right as defined by those fanatical Danes who make the mics.

Well, it took them almost two years, but they did it. They came up with a single ear mic that is not only more secure than almost any single ear design out there, it’s also more comfortable and less obtrusive. And it has the same great DPA sound we know and love. At least that’s what we were told. I was anxious to try one.

Read more: DPA DFine Mic - First Thoughts

 

Shure SRH840 Headphone - reviewed

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Shure SRH840 Headphone - in a word, "Wow!"

by Eric Chancey, @BigDaddyDecibel

OK, it's time for an admission.  The subject of headphones has never really made my heart skip a beat. I mean, you put them on, confirm that you have a signal at the mixer input and move on, right? 

I've always been of the camp that thought that headphones couldn't really be trusted for anything serious in terms of the mix.  Beyond that, the headphones I've had were uncomfortable and I just wouldn't use them unless it was an absolute necessity.

That was pretty much my attitude toward headphones until a friend recently introduced me to the Shure SRH840 headphone. Again, I have to admit something. I tried them reluctantly, just to appease him, not having any idea that I would be in for a treat.
 
The first thing I noticed was...

Read more: Shure SRH840 Headphone - reviewed

   

Line 6 Relay G50 Instrument Wireless - Review

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Line 6 Relay G50 instrument wireless review. (GearTechs.com)

by Kirk Eberhard

The Relay G50 Wireless Guitar System is a recent offering from digital instrument pioneers Line 6. Operating on the FCC/DTV compliant 2.4 GHz band and utilizing a 24-bit ADA conversion system, the G50 boasts 10-20KHz bandwidth and 120 db dynamic range. Since I don't own expensive scopes and test gear, I'll leave the validation of these specs to someone with a more scientific bent and instead give a hands-on, rubber-meets-road type of review. I tested the Relay G50 in a variety of venues and locales, and it delivered flawless performance with outstanding fidelity and remarkable battery life. At a street price of just under $400.00, it's an unqualified winner.

First Impressions...

When I first received the Relay G50 I plugged the transmitter into my Jazz bass, and gave it a shakedown run through a favorite hi-fi practice amp. The system passed the unadulterated sound of my beloved bass with no audible noise or phasing. In spite of the proximity of my Wi-Fi connected laptop, nothing I did generated anything like interference or static, so I headed out my back door for a stroll around the yard. Putting over 100' between me and the receiver did not cause any unwanted sounds or diminish the clarity and dynamics of the audio signal. Of course, there were only the usual household EMF fields and Wi-Fi networks that might present potential interference, but this superb performance would later be confirmed on many stages, from 500-seat nightclubs to 2,500-seat theaters and huge outdoor festival stages. Furthermore, the Relay G50 has seen duty in several different cities and states without a single rizz, pop, or dropout, so my concerns about the effects of high data traffic over the widely-used 2.4 GHz band were put to rest.

Features and Details...

The Relay G50 transmitter and receiver are both quite solid and substantial, and inspire immediate confidence...

Read more: Line 6 Relay G50 Instrument Wireless - Review

   

Electro-Voice RE320 Reviewed

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

by Mike Sessler, Coast Hills Community Church

The ElectroVoice RE20 has been from it's introduction a favorite of broadcasters and announcers. Somewhere along the line, someone stuck it in front of a bass cabinet and discovered it rocks as a bass mic. Then someone else put it in a kick drum and found it works wonders there, too. In fact, the RE20 is great on a lot of things. And while it's not super-expensive (at least by premium microphone standards), at $400-ish, it's not a budget mic either.

EV realized there was a market for a more cost-conscious version of the RE20. In January, 2011 at NAMM in Anaheim, they introduced the RE320. Priced at $299.

When I saw it at NAMM, I knew I had to try it. I've used the RE20 in the past, and always liked it. But I have a hard time justifying the price tag when I have so many other things that need attention.

The week before Easter, a box arrived; it was my demo RE320. We were re-setting the stage anyway, so I pulled the PR-48 out of the kick and stuck the RE320 in. I think it was the second or third kick during line check that I knew this mic was not going back.

I've tried a lot of different mics in the kick, and have only really ever been happy with one; the Heil PR-40. I'd love a PR-40, but at $325, it's a tougher sell. The PR-48 was okay, but I never felt we could get it positioned to give us both the punch and the clarity I wanted from the kick. We could get one or the other, but not both.

When I arrived at Coast, we had the "classic" combination of a Beta 91 inside and a Beta 52 in the hole. I know a lot of guys who like the dual mic technique in the kick, and I respect that. My preference however, is to use one. There are a lot of reasons for that which I won't detail here. But know that it's preference thing and I don't think dual mic'ing is wrong. I'd just rather not.

Read more: Electro-Voice RE320 Reviewed

   

Heil PR22UT - pro audio's best kept secret

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Quietly about a year ago, Heil Sound did something remarkable.  Not so much in a technical way, but in a practical way. 

The microphone business is tough.  Certain models have dominated the music scene for years, and it's darn hard for people to change their habits.  At the time, the Heil PR22 microphone was selling for $165, and was quickly increased to $182. 

When the world's most popular microphones sell for $99.95 (and there are 3-4 good ones right at that price point), I had to admit that I was disappointed.  $99.95 is a magic price point.  Pastors and tech directors don't need approval to spend $99.95, $99.95 seems like the "right" price for a mic, and the list goes on.  $99.95 just works in the same way that gasoline at $3.999 is somehow cheaper than gas at $4.00. 

So what did Heil Sound do?  The people there decided to package the PR22 without the fancy carrying case and without the extra black and extra gold windscreens and called it the PR22UT.

UT stands for utility.  It has a nickel colored windscreen and comes in a simple vinyl bag with a mic clip.  The price?

Read more: Heil PR22UT - pro audio's best kept secret

   

Page 7 of 13

Newsletter

Newsletter

What others say

Hi Dave,
We were incredibly impressed by the work the guys did. The system sounds great and Gary was a great help to us getting our feet wet with the new board. I feel pretty comfortable on it and I think most of our guys do as well.

Rev. Matthew Slater
Champion Church of the Nazarene