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Technology for Worship:

It's what we do.

Welcome to Geartechs.com. We want to be your #1 source for pro audio, video, projection, and lighting equipment.

Our site offers the latest product reviews, how-to guides, news, and our blog to give you detailed insight and up-to-the-minute information that will help you discover exactly what you need.

   
Hand-picked Professional Audio Equipment.
Many dealers sell anything and everything. We sell what works. Get the right product every time at Geartechs.com.
   
Professional Video & Projection Equipment
Need something new, but aren’t sure what? Do your research, ask a pro and buy the right equipment here.
   
Lighting & Musical Equipment
In addition to pro audio and video gear, we offer select lighting and musical products to enhance your worship experience.

To Upgrade Or Not?

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To Upgrade Or Not?

by Mike Sessler, ChurchTechArts.org

A few months ago, Outreach Magazine asked me to come up with a few questions they could pose in a short article called, Should We Go For It?. Being the over-achiever that I am, I wrote 850 words. When the article came out, they published about 60 of them. Since I thought this was actually a pretty good article, I'm publishing it here, with the lesson learned (when someone asks for a few questions, write a few questions). The good news is that you—the reader of this blog—get the whole article...

Whenever making new technology purchases or technology upgrades, it's important to think through the reasoning behind them as well as the actual purchase/upgrade process. Here are five things to think about when evaluating technology.

Does the technology further or enhance our mission as a church?

In other words, what do you feel you can't do now (or aren't doing well) that is critical to your churches specific mission? Of course, this presupposes you are really clear on the mission of your church, but that's another article. Too many churches want a piece of technology because...

Read more: To Upgrade Or Not?

 

Shure SRH840 Headphone - reviewed

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Shure SRH840 Headphone - in a word, "Wow!"

by Eric Chancey, @BigDaddyDecibel

OK, it's time for an admission.  The subject of headphones has never really made my heart skip a beat. I mean, you put them on, confirm that you have a signal at the mixer input and move on, right? 

I've always been of the camp that thought that headphones couldn't really be trusted for anything serious in terms of the mix.  Beyond that, the headphones I've had were uncomfortable and I just wouldn't use them unless it was an absolute necessity.

That was pretty much my attitude toward headphones until a friend recently introduced me to the Shure SRH840 headphone. Again, I have to admit something. I tried them reluctantly, just to appease him, not having any idea that I would be in for a treat.
 
The first thing I noticed was...

Read more: Shure SRH840 Headphone - reviewed

   

CTA Classroom - Using a Click

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by Mike Sessler, ChurchTechArts.org

A lot of worship bands want to play to a click track, a metronome that keeps everyone on time. There are quite a few companies (Boss, Korg, Yamaha) who make small, portable metronomes, and most have an 1/8” headphone or even a 1/4” headphone jack on them.

I’m not going to debate the use of a click and what it does or doesn’t do for the music; that’s another debate for another article. At this point, all I’m assuming is that the band wants to use a click and you as the audio engineer has to figure out how to make it work. There are several scenarios to consider, and I’ll try to come up with as many as I can.

Basic Configuration

First, you need to find a metronome (hereafter called a click because it’s faster to type…) with a headphone or line out. Take that output and route it into a DI. We have a cheap DI that’s designed to take a 1/4” stereo (TRS) source and turn it into two XLRs. Someone replaced the 1/4” with a 1/8” plug and we use that to get the click into the system. While you could buy a really expensive Radial DI for this purpose, it’s a click, so a cheap one will do fine. Set up gain for a solid, but not slamming level and you’re good to go. I use mono for the click; I’m not convinced stereo is worth the channel count.

Once in the system, you have to be very intentional about how you route it. Most mixers allow you to assign a channel to either a group or the L&R bus. With the click, you want to leave it unassigned. This is really important as you don’t want the click coming through the mains.

Read more: CTA Classroom - Using a Click

   

Line 6 Relay G50 Instrument Wireless - Review

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Line 6 Relay G50 instrument wireless review. (GearTechs.com)

by Kirk Eberhard

The Relay G50 Wireless Guitar System is a recent offering from digital instrument pioneers Line 6. Operating on the FCC/DTV compliant 2.4 GHz band and utilizing a 24-bit ADA conversion system, the G50 boasts 10-20KHz bandwidth and 120 db dynamic range. Since I don't own expensive scopes and test gear, I'll leave the validation of these specs to someone with a more scientific bent and instead give a hands-on, rubber-meets-road type of review. I tested the Relay G50 in a variety of venues and locales, and it delivered flawless performance with outstanding fidelity and remarkable battery life. At a street price of just under $400.00, it's an unqualified winner.

First Impressions...

When I first received the Relay G50 I plugged the transmitter into my Jazz bass, and gave it a shakedown run through a favorite hi-fi practice amp. The system passed the unadulterated sound of my beloved bass with no audible noise or phasing. In spite of the proximity of my Wi-Fi connected laptop, nothing I did generated anything like interference or static, so I headed out my back door for a stroll around the yard. Putting over 100' between me and the receiver did not cause any unwanted sounds or diminish the clarity and dynamics of the audio signal. Of course, there were only the usual household EMF fields and Wi-Fi networks that might present potential interference, but this superb performance would later be confirmed on many stages, from 500-seat nightclubs to 2,500-seat theaters and huge outdoor festival stages. Furthermore, the Relay G50 has seen duty in several different cities and states without a single rizz, pop, or dropout, so my concerns about the effects of high data traffic over the widely-used 2.4 GHz band were put to rest.

Features and Details...

The Relay G50 transmitter and receiver are both quite solid and substantial, and inspire immediate confidence...

Read more: Line 6 Relay G50 Instrument Wireless - Review

   

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What others say

WOW!!! I installed the projector last night and can't believe how bad the old one was! I can't wait to see the congregation's faces on Sunday morning during the missions video! This baby is bright and clear. Very nice!

Showed the projector to the pastor last night and he said "Hmm..now you'll have people complaining it's too bright!" He marveled at the color correctness and contrast and his wheels started turning as to new ways we can minister with it.

Eric Shaver, Crossville, TN

 

 

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